Why Tell The Story?

1. “That’s not a good way to die — before you’ve told the end of your story.”

“Two old African men were sitting on that bench, but there was room for me too. In Africa people share more than just water in a brotherly or sisterly fashion. Even when it comes to shade, people are generous. I heard the two men talking about a third old man who had recently died.

One of them said, “I was visiting him at his home. He started to tell me an amazing story about something that had happened to him when he was young. But it was a long story. Night came, and we decided that I should come back the next day to hear the rest. But when I arrived, he was dead.”

The man fell silent. I decided not to leave that bench until I heard how the other man would respond to what he’d heard. I had an instinctive feeling that it would prove to be important.

Finally, he too, spoke. “That’s not a good way to die — before you’ve told the end of your story.”  (Henning Mankell. The Art of Listening. Published: December 10, 2011)

2. Never Die With Your Song Still In You:

“Most men lead lives of quiet desperation and go to the grave with the song still in them.” (Henry David Thoreau)

3. Humanity Changers Tell Warrior Stories Around The Fire:

“The most important thing in all human relationships is conversation, but people don’t talk anymore, they don’t sit down to talk and listen. They go to the theater, the cinema, watch television, listen to the radio, read books, but they almost never talk. If we want to change the world, we have to go back to a time when warriors would gather around a fire and tell stories.”(Paulo Coelho. the-zahir)

4. Stories Release Our Inconvenient Sadness:

“Pain and suffering are always inevitable for a large intelligence and a deep heart. The really great men must, I think, have great sadness on earth.” ― Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Crime and Punishment

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